Our Performance

Safety Indicators

St. Michael’s works hard to ensure patients are safe during their care in the hospital. We monitor many indicators including the number of people who get infectious diseases.

Hospital-acquired infections are those that patients get during their time in hospital that they did not have when they arrived. They are usually spread by micro-organisms such as bacteria or viruses. Many of these infections are also caught in the community – at home, school or work – but we are particularly concerned about people with existing health problems catching infections.

More information about healthcare-associated infection is available here.

Clostridium difficile Infection

All hospitals monitor the rate of patients who contract c. difficile while in hospital. In this graph, we show the rate of infection per 1,000 patient days. This is a standard measure used by all organizations to make it easier to compare infection rates. The closer the rate is to zero the better. Below the graph, we are also reporting the actual number of cases in a given month. As you can see, the number of new cases is generally less than five.

More info on C.difficile

FusionCharts
New Cases of C.Difficile
  Oct. 2015 Nov. 2015 Dec. 2015 Jan. 2016 Feb. 2016 March 2016 April 2016 May 2016 June 2016 July 2016 Aug. 2016 Sept. 2016
New Cases <5 <5 <5 <5 <5 6 <5 5 6 <5 0 <5

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

As with c. difficile, we show our infection rate per 1,000 patient days. This information is reported quarterly, rather than monthly. Again, the closer the rate is to zero, the better. The actual new cases show that we have never had more than five cases in a quarter.

More info on MRSA

FusionCharts

New Cases of MRSA

  Jan. - March 2015 April - June 2015 July - Sept. 2015 Oct. - Dec. 2015 Jan. - March 2016 April - June 2016 July - Sept. 2016
New Cases <5 0 0 <5 <5 0 <5

Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE)

This graph monitors the rate of VRE per 1,000 patient days. The table below shows the new cases of VRE in a given quarter. As you can see, we rarely have any VRE infections.

More info on VRE.

FusionCharts

New Cases of VRE bacteremia

  Oct. - Dec. 2014 Jan. - March 2015 April - June 2015 July - Sept. 2015 Oct. - Dec. 2015 Jan. - March 2016 July - Sept. 2016
New Cases of VRE 0 0 0 <5 0 0 0

Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP)

In this case, we show the rate of VAP infection per 1,000 ventillator days (the number of patients x the number of days they were on ventilators). Again, we are working to keep our rate as close to zero as possible. The actual new cases show that we rarely have more than five cases in a quarter.

More info on VAP.

FusionCharts

New cases of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP)

  Oct. - Dec. 2014 Jan. - March 2015 April - June 2015 July - Sept. 2015 Oct. - Dec. 2015 Jan. - March 2016 July - Sept. 2016
New VAP cases <5 <5 <5 <5 <5 7 <5

Central Line Infections

Patients who receive medication or blood products over long periods of time may have a central line placed to make it easier to provide intravenous treatments. This graph shows the rate of infections as a result of these central lines. The rate is monitored quarterly per 1,000 patient days. The actual number of new central line infections is shown below the graph.

More info on Central Line Infections.

Administration of Antibiotics & Hip and Knee Surgery

In order to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections, antibiotics are given before many surgeries begin. At St. Michael’s, we have a protocol to give antibiotics prior to all hip and knee surgeries. This graph shows the level of compliance with this protocol.

FusionCharts

New Cases of Central Line Infection (CLI)

  Oct. - Dec. 2014 Jan. - March 2015 April - June 2015 July - Sept. 2015 Oct. - Dec. 2015 Jan. - March 2016 July - Sept. 2016
New CLI cases 6 <5 <5 <5 5 <5 6

Hand Hygiene

Hand washing is one of the most effective ways of reducing hospital-acquired infections. St. Michael’s uses a protocol called:

The Four Moments for Hand Hygiene

  • Before contact with the patient or the patient's environment
  • Before an aseptic procedure
  • After any body fluid exposure risk
  • After contact with the patient or the patient's environment

This graph shows the percentage of staff who comply with the first and last moments – before and after contact with a patient. Compliance is established through audits, where one person visually monitors staff in a specific area. These audits are consolidated to arrive at this quarterly rate.

More info on hand hygiene.

FusionCharts-HHygiene

Hand Hygiene compliance

  Jan. - March 2015 April - June 2015 July - Sept. 2015 Oct. - Dec. 2015 Jan. - March 2016 April - June 2016 July - Sept. 2016
Compliance before patient contact (per cent) 61 61 69 69 67 63 60
Compliance after patient contact (per cent) 78 75 79 79 74 70 68